Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Greetings friends!

Just in case you’re still out there, I wanted to alert you to the existence of a new pop crit venture I’ve undertaken, in partnership with the glorious Elise Moore. Our plan? To discuss every time travel movie ever made. (We’ll also be delving into TV, comics, short stories, and novels, whenever we can conjure up the time to do so.)

Our first cast concerns a pair of meditations on the uncannily paradoxical relationship between romantic love and absence – William Dieterle’s Portrait of Jennie (1948) and Jeannot Szwarc’s Somewhere in Time (1980).

No iTunes feed yet, but I can discern the lineaments of its eventual appearance.

Hope you’ll give it a try!

Yours in Time,

Dave

Greetings friends –

Just wanted to remind you that I’m working ’round the clock to provide the best Hot Docs coverage I can muster. I’ve got six reviews up at Sound on Sight – and you can expect a lot more in the week ahead!

Hope to see you there!

Dave

Hot Docs 2013

Dear Anagramsci Readers–

Hope you’ll consider following my coverage of Hot Docs 2013 for Sound on Sight magazine. You can find a complete round-up of my pieces right here (and I’ll be doing a fair bit of tweeting as well, as @milescoverdale). I’m planning to see (and review) more than 20 of the docs on the festival docket – and I’ve been fortunate to receive several advance screeners of the documentaries, so things are already well under way!

Good afternoon friends!

Dave

 

 

vlcsnap-2012-07-22-18h54m42s71Dear Anagramsci (and Motime) Readers:

Please note that my new culture-blogging home is right here (at Sound on Sight Magazine). I’ll be writing about comics, movies and maybe even television, at some point. At the moment, I’m winding up my press coverage of the Toronto Silent Film Festival (which it has been a real privilege to attend). Hope you’ll bookmark that first link – or at least check in on what I’m up to over there, from time to time.

And don’t hesitate to comment, quarrel (I’ll be making it a priority to respond promptly!) and share these pieces with others!

Thanks friends!

Dave

Hello friends!

I’ve been spending a lot of time on Craigslist lately (looking for new places to live) and discovering all over again what a cultural studies goldmine that place is. The experience has put me in the mood to revive an old idea of mine — i.e. translating some of the choicest “Missed Connection” pleas/vague threats into reasonably objective discourse.

Expect to read these on a fairly regular basis from now on (they’re a lot quicker to write than my King Vidor posts!).

We’ll kick things off with a little gem from my current town of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada:

Walnut Grove Pool…youre the tall swim teacher – m4w – 23 (Walnut Grove)

Our eyes met ar walnut grove pool this afternoon/evening….you are the tall gorgeous swim teacher…i was awkwardly flying down the slide with my two little neices and saw you there…we locked a few other times and shared a smile or two.. I hope to see those stunning eyes and long black hair one more time..

I hope the kid in your class gave you my note…if not ..maybe just maybe we will connect again.

If this person had any self-knowledge, the post might have gone a little something like this:

Walnut Grove Pool… You should probably find another job, because I’m never going to leave you alone – mstalkw – 23 

I couldn’t help ogling you while you were trying to teach kids how to swim today. I’m a creepy, physically spastic uncle who often drags my adorable nieces to public places where it is acceptable to go semi-nude in an attempt to convince the women I see there that I’m good, solid boyfriend material. You shot me a few worried glances and nervous smiles, and this only served to stoke the fire of my one-way desire for your bikini clad bod. I also like your eyes and long black hair – I hope you don’t get that restraining order right away, ’cause I’d like to see ‘em again. Next time I’ll snap pictures so I can make you my screensave sweetheart.

Did you like the way I forced a little kid to mess with your pedagogic dynamic by getting him to treat you like a piece of meat instead of a figure to be respected and heeded? I’ve got a lot of other tricks like that up my sleeve, so don’t go getting comfortable, you hear?

The Technicolor Scare

More fascinating stuff (or, at any rate, stuff that I find fascinating) from the Photoplay digital archive (this one’s from January 1935).

I guess the mid-1930s public was so accustomed to new technologies gutting the star system that they had begun to expect these purges as a matter of course. Personally, I’d love to see some alternate-reality Singin’ in the Rain about a world in which actors are winnowed out of the spotlight by their unsightly blemishes. (Of course, color-discrimination had been going on in Hollywood and everywhere else in America long before any new filmstrip processes were invented.)

The story continues here and here.

Turns out the article is actually more concerned with forcing readers to accept the idea that good films don’t have to be made in black and white…

Hitchcock’s Vertigo

anagramsci:

Since Vertigo is certainly on a lot of people’s minds these days, I figured I might as well resurrect this characteristically demented post from a few years ago…

Originally posted on Anagramsci:

Oil up your rubber plant leaves, we’re in for a vertiginous afternoon…

vlcsnap-250384

Inspired by David Cairns‘ wonderful Vertigo post, I took another look at the film (a longtime favourite) last night. And today, as fate would have it, I find myself in possession of the power and the freedom to do something about it.

But what?

I’ve read so much about this movie–and referred back to it in so many discussions (often revolving around Lynch, De Palma or 1970s Amazing Spider-Man comics)–that I’m not sure where to begin my own proper blog entry on Hitchcock’s masterpiece.

I do, at least, feel comfortable describing the film in those terms. But that’s where the comfort ends. This is a polarizing movie. And it should polarize you, as a viewer–especially if you happen to be a male gazer. When I first saw it, as a youngster, it made me really

View original 1,271 more words

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 822 other followers

%d bloggers like this: